ACTIVE TOPICS SEARCH FAQ & RULES
 All Forums
 Shows A
 Airwolf
 The jet plane in Daddy's Gone a Hunt'n

Note: You must be Registered and Logged in in order to post a reply.

Screensize:
Format Mode:
Format: BoldItalicizedUnderlineStrikethrough Align LeftCenteredAlign Right Horizontal Rule Insert HyperlinkInsert Email Insert CodeInsert QuoteInsert List Add YouTube video
   
Message:

* HTML is OFF
* Forum Code is ON
Smilies
Smile [:)] Big Smile [:D] Cool [8D] Blush [:I]
Tongue [:P] Evil [):] Wink [;)] Clown [:o)]
Black Eye [B)] Eight Ball [8] Frown [:(] Shy [8)]
Shocked [:0] Angry [:(!] Dead [xx(] Sleepy [|)]
Kisses [:X] Approve [^] Disapprove [V] Question [?]
ThumbsUp [Y] ThumbsDown [N] Wave [:wave]
 
 
   

T O P I C    R E V I E W
jaemoon Posted - 12/11/2006 : 15:55:18
This may have been asked here before, but I can't find it right now. Just look at the picture.

Does anybody know exactly what type of aircraft it was? I've tried searching the Internet around but found no clue. As far as I know, it was not a model which has ever been in service with the US air force. Is it maybe a civil jet plane specially manufactured on commercial sale?

I would appreciate your help. Thanks in advance.

20   L A T E S T    R E P L I E S    (Newest First)
Bell430drvr Posted - 12/13/2006 : 22:39:26
It's called a Skyfox, and was made by Boeing. It was made as a primary trainer to compete and replace the Cessna T-37 Tweety Bird. It never won the contract. It has Garrett TFE-731 engines, the same that are on the Falcon 10, 20, 50, 900, Astra Jet, Westwind, and of course, the Lear Jet 30's/55 series. Affectionaltely known as Garrett grenades. They are good engines though.
trissybabes Posted - 12/13/2006 : 13:57:04
You know it's funny, the exact name of the jet - "Skyfox" was used in the Airwolf 2 novel "Trouble From Within" by Ron Renauld too.

I thought he had simply adapted it from "Firefox"!
Alchemist Posted - 12/13/2006 : 07:59:17
And of course the pics:

Alchemist Posted - 12/13/2006 : 07:50:02
I've found the following info doing a google search:

Boeing Skyfox
Introduction
On 22 March 1948 the first Lockheed T-33 'T-Bird' (designated TF-80C and serialed 48-356) made its first flight. A total of 6,557 T-33s were produced in Canada, Japan and the USA between 1948 and 1959, and many were delivered to other nations under the Mutual Defence Aid Programme (MDAP). About 700 T-33s were still in service at the end of 1986.
At the beginning of the 1980s, the Skyfox Corporation (later Boeing) proposed a remanufacturing programme for the T-33. The programme included the replacement of the Allison J33-A-35 turbojet by two Garrett TFE731-3A turbofans and an extensive redesign of the airframe, but no customers could be found for the Skyfox.


Development
In 1982, a number of former Lockheed employees, lead by T-33 designer Irvin Culver, formed Flight Concepts Incorporated, later known as the Skyfox Corporation.
To improve the performance and the reliability of the T-33 and to obtain a modern trainer at half the cost (by utilizing standard production methods and commercially available components) of new aircraft, such as the British Aerospace (BAe) Hawk and the Dassault-Breguet Alpha Jet, the Skyfox Corporation proposed a conversion of the T-33.

The Skyfox Corporporation purchased about 80 T-33s for conversion, but they hoped to convert a total of 240 T-33s of the 700 in service at that time.

The first conversion was a former Canadian Armed Forces (CAF)/Forces Armees Canadiennes (FAC) Canadair CT-133 (CL-30/T-33A-N) Silver Star 3PT (Pilot Trainer), formerly a Silver Star 3AT (Armament Trainer). The aircraft, produced in 1958, had construction number T.33-160 and serial number 21160. It was struck-off charge on 10 November 1970 and was sold through Crown Assets Disposal Corporation (a Crown Corporation, i.e. a business owned by the Canadian government) to Leroy Penhall/Fighter Imports and registered as N12414 in 1973. It was then sold to Murray McCormick Aerial Surveys, as N12414, in 1975. Its next owner was Consolidated Leasing, still as N12414, in 1977.

It was sold to the Skyfox Corporation, as N221SF, on 14 January 1983 and went next to Flight Test Research, as N221SF, in August 1983. Its first flight as the prototype Skyfox was on 23 August 1983, nearly 35.5 years after the first flight of the T-33. Race and test pilot Skip Holm performed the initial flight test at Mojave Airport, California. The prototype Skyfox was white overall, with black cheat lines, and a very pale blue trim.

The Skyfox Corporation initially failed to secure contracts for this highly capable trainer. In 1986, however, the Boeing Military Airplane Company recognized the aircraft's potential and acquired the marketing and production rights for the Skyfox, but not enought orders were obtained by Boeing to continue the project.

The registration N221SF had been cancelled at the end of 1997.


Structure Changes
The design team proposed retaining about 70 per cent of the structure of the T-33 and replacing the ancient Allison J33-A-35 turbojet with a pair of 1,678 kg thrust Garrett TFE731-3A turbofans, mounted on the rear fuselage sides.
Other modifications included inboard wing leading-edge extensions, the replacement of the tip tanks with winglets, new canopy with one-piece windshield, revised nose geometry to improved visibility from the cockpit and to fair into the T-33's lateral intakes, new tail surfaces with a mid-set tailplane, and new avionics.


Powerplant
Announced in April 1969, the TFE371 is a two-spool geared turbofan designed for business jet aircraft. The use of a geared fan confers flexibility in operation and yields optimum performance at up to 15,545 m.
The removal of the J33-A-35 turbojet allowed the orginal T-33 inlets to be used for the internal stowage of fuel formerly carried in the tip tanks of the T-33 (two 800 litre tanks). This allowed the tip tanks to be removed, and thus reducing the external drag while maintaining the full 3,191 litre standard fuel capacity of the T-33. Moreover, the Skyfox retained the orginal tip tank fittings, permitting the re-installation of the tip tanks and the aviability of 4,932 litres of fuel.


Specification of the Garrett TFE371-3A
Performance rating:
Static thrust: 1,678 kg.
Specific fuel consumption:
Static thrust: 23.30 mg/Ns.

Dimensions
Length: 1,440 mm. Intake diameter: 869 mm.

Weights
Dry weight: 345 kg.

Conversion Options
The Skyfox was designed to be produced entirely from kits of components. The conversion involved the disassembly, the inspection, and the refurbishment of the T-33 airframe as necessary, the installation of the kits and reassembly of the airframe in the Skyfox configuration.
There were two conversion options:


To purchase a complete Skyfox from Boeing. The airframe could be supplied by Boeing or by the country itself.
To purchase a conversion kit from Boeing and perform the conversion in the country itself.
The standard conversion kit included:


Two Garrett TFE371-3A turbofans, the nacelles, and the propulsion support system.
Nose assembly.
Tail assembly.
Fuel system and managment panel.
Single-point refuelling.
Aerodynamic refinement kit.
Structural refinement kit.
Nose wheel steering.
Anti-skid power brakes.
Single-piece windscreen.
Hydraulic components kit.
Powerplant instrument master caution panel.
Generator control and distribution system.
Throttle quadrants and control system.
Powerplant start panel.
Fire extinguishing system.
In addition to the standard conversion kit described above, Boeing also offered a number of options such as those liseted below, that could further improve the overall capability of the Skyfox.


Avionics upgrade
Basic rewiring of the aircraft.
Tactical, reconnaissance, and electronic warfare (EW) training mission packages.
Zero-zero ejection seat.

Missions
The Skyfox was mission modular. Under this concept, self-contained nose modules, a large internal payload volume of over sixty cubic feet due to the removal of the J33-A-35 turbojet of the T-33, and ten underwing hardpoints allowed the Skyfox to perform a variety of missions, including:

Attack
Air combat tactical training.
Close air support (CAS).
Drug interdiction.
Electronic warfare (EW).
Fighter lead-in training.
Forward air control (FAC).
Martime patrol.
Pilot proficiency training.
Pilot transition.
Reconnaissance.
Target towing.
Threat simulation.

Costs
The operating and support costs of the Skyfox were less than that of the T-33 and could compete with the costs of the Hawk and the Alpha Jet. Structeral improvements, avionics upgrades, electrical rewiring, airframe and systems refurbishment, and powerplant modifications resulted in low cost, low maintenance hours and low spare parts consumption.
The two TFE371-3A turbofans that powered the Skyfox together weighted 17 per cent less than the single J33-A-35 turbojet of the T-33, while producing 60 per cent more thrust and consuming 45 per cent less fuel. The TFE371-3A turbofan had a ten-fold increase in time between overhauls (TBO) compared with the J33-A-35 turbojet. The result was a greatly improved maneuverability, range, endurance, payload and the added overwater and hostile terrain safety of the twin powerplant configuration.


Customers
Portugal
To replace the T-33A, Portugal signed a letter of intent with the Skyfox Corporation in the middle of the 1980s for twenty conversion kits. The Forca Aerea Portuguesa (FAP) proposed that Oficinas Gerais de Material Aeronautico (OGMA) in Alverca would undertake the conversions, but insufficient orders were obtained from other nations to motivate Boeing to continue with the project.

USA
Even the USAF was interested in the Skyfox. It was orginally planned to demonstrate the Skyfox at Farnborough International 1986, but the aircraft was tested at the time by the USAF. Eventually, the USAF did not purchase the Skyfox.

Performance Comparison of the T-33 and the Skyfox
In the table is a comparison of the performance of the T-33A and the Skyfox.

T-33A Skyfox
Weight 6,847 kg 7,364 kg
Rate of climb at sea level 1,036 m/min > 1,494 m//min
Time to 9,144 m 15 min 8 min and 12 sec
Range1, 2 2,315 km 3,630 km (internal fuel)

4,815 km (internal and external fuel)
Endurance1, 2 2 hours 5.1 hours (internal fuel)

7 hours (internal and external fuel)
Take-off distance over 15 m 1,402 m 793 m



Notes
Reserves: 20 min at sea level and five per cent additional mission fuel.
Loiter and cruise speed at 12,192 m.
The Skyfox flight envelope was equal or superior to the T-33 flight envelope in every aspect, while providing higher performance and improved handling characteristics within this enveloppe. The landing roll of the Skyfox was also reduced in comparison with the T-33A.


Serial of the Boeing Skyfox
N221SF Boeing Skyfox
First flight on 23 August 1983


Specification of the Boeing Skyfox
Type:
Tandem two-seat advanced trainer and light tactical support aircraft.
Powerplant:
Two 1,678 kg Garrett TFE731-3A turbofans.
Fuel capacity:
Internal fuel capacity: 3,191 litres. Total fuel capacity: 4,932 litres.
Performance:
Maximum speed: 935 km/h at sea level and 850 km/h at 12,000 m. Rate of climb: > 1,494 m/min at sea level and 300 m/min at height. Time to 9,144 m: 8 min and 12 sec. Service ceiling: 12,192 m. Range: 3,630 km on internal fuel and 4,815 km on internal and external fuel. Maximum range: 5,560 km. Endurance: 5.1 hours on internal fuel and 7 hours on internal and external fuel. Take-off distance over 15 m: 793 m.
Dimensions:
Span: 11.83 m. Length: 13.41 m. Height: 3.76 m.
Weights:
Empty weight: 3,856 kg. Take-off weight: 6,532 kg. Maximum take-off weight: 7,364 kg.
Armament:
A total of 2,700 kg of armament on ten underwing hardpoints.
Sources
Air Classics, Volume 19, Number 11, November 1983.
Air Forces Montly - July 1998 (Number 124), T-bird at fifty, Rene J. Francillon, Key Publishing Limited, Stamford, United Kingdom, 1998.
Aviation Week & Space Technology, 23 May 1983.
Aviation Week & Space Technology, 29 August 1983, Page 23.
Aviation Week & Space Technology, 26 September 1983.
Aviation Week & Space Technology, 5 March 1984, Page 39 to 46.
Boeing Skyfox - National Defense, Boeing Military Airplane Company, 1987.
Boeing Skyfox - Tactical Modernization at Low Cost, Boeing Military Airplane Company, 1987.
Encyclopedia of World Military Aircraft - Single Volume Edition, D. Donald and J. Lake, Aerospace Publishing Limited, London, United Kingdom, 1996,
Flight International, 13 December 1986, Page 32 to 34.
Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1990-91 (Eighty-first edition), M. Lambert, Jane's Information Group Limited, Surrey, United Kingdom, 1990.
Lockheed Aircraft since 1913, R.J. Francillon, Naval Institute Press, 1988.
Luchtvaart - november 1986 (3de Jaargang, Nummer 11), Skyfox - Een moderne trainer voor de smalle beurs, Page 308, Ten Brink Meppel B.V., Meppel, the Netherlands, 1986.
N-Number Database (http://www.landings.com).
Portugal, Salvador, World Air Power Journal, Volume 24, Spring 1996.
Slyfox, Boeing Military Airplane Company, October 1987.
The Aircraft of the Canadian Armed Forces, Second Edition, Jeff Rankin-Lowe, 1998.
United States Military Aircraft Since 1909, Gordon Swanborough and Peter M. Bowers, Smithsonian, 1989.
Ruud Deurenberg, 12 June 1998
jaemoon Posted - 12/13/2006 : 07:24:45
Thank you, everyone, for the information. Fortunately I got the same answer from members of the Usenet newsgroup "REC.AVIATION.MILITARY", too and I finally got to know the jet plane was Boeing Skyfox. I thought I would put the result here in order to share it with you, but you already did.

It'd be better if the Boeing Company's official website had that information. Boeing never seems to deal with its unsuccessful prototypes. One example is the YUH-61 helicopter, the contender which lost the competition with the current UH-60 Blackhawk.

In addition, I found its name "Skyfox" has been mentionned by Martin G. Grant in the topic "Imagine you are on the CBS 4th Season Prod. Staff!" before. He exactly knew it.

Anyway, it's a very rare aircraft indeed, so the related information, links and photos are very important. Thanks again.
Captaindev Posted - 12/13/2006 : 01:37:44
http://www.csd.uwo.ca/~pettypi/elevon/baugher_other/skyfox.html

Good find! Check the link above for more history on this trainer. The program I was talking about that was broadcast by PBS was probably from the mid-80's, and that was before Boeing got involved in the project.
Fair_Owl Posted - 12/12/2006 : 23:29:16
One more bit of trivia:

http://eu.airliners.net/photos/middle/6/1/5/0740516.jpg

This is the same aircraft before conversion to N221SF.

O
PeregrineFalcon Posted - 12/12/2006 : 23:24:59
quote:
Originally posted by Fair_Owl

quote:
Originally posted by PeregrineFalcon

I located a trainer on wikipedia known as the Boeing Skyfox.


Oh, you star!

I searched Wikipedia for ages and didn't spot that one! How appropriate, though: Skyfox ... Airwolf...

Thanks for persisting.

O



lol I thought the same thing for Skyfox and Airwolf when I read the name. I had almost given up when I found at the bottom of an article, list of aircraft. I took a chance and it had a trainer list in it so I clicked on it and kept searching. I came across the Skyfox and there wasn't a picture. So I took a chance with that link and found that picture and also read up on the specs to see that it's first flight was August 1983. So that seemed to fit. And I'm could help and I'm happy to keep searching for something until I find it for anyone. So thank you Fair_Owl and Andrew_Hawke for your compliments on my location of the aircraft.
Fair_Owl Posted - 12/12/2006 : 23:15:39
quote:
Originally posted by PeregrineFalcon

I located a trainer on wikipedia known as the Boeing Skyfox.


Oh, you star!

I searched Wikipedia for ages and didn't spot that one! How appropriate, though: Skyfox ... Airwolf... Just the one aircraft built, converted from an old T-33 trainer, and first flew August 1983.

Thanks for persisting.

Edit: found the probable N-number: N221SF.

Another nice pic here: http://www.super-mystere.net/ci004/planche/pages/23.htm

O
Andrew_Hawke Posted - 12/12/2006 : 23:03:56
heh heh. I think you've cracked it.

PeregrineFalcon Posted - 12/12/2006 : 22:29:30
I located a trainer on wikipedia known as the Boeing Skyfox. Take a look at http://www.highgallery.com/military-aircraft-skyfox.html and judge for yourselves.
PeregrineFalcon Posted - 12/12/2006 : 17:08:40
quote:
Originally posted by Fair_Owl

It ain't a MiG! The MiG-23 has high swingwings, internally-mounted engines, a lower tail plane, and is generally much bigger. And was unavailable to TV shows in the 1980s; however, imagine what Airwolf shows would have been like in 1984 if they'd had access to genuine Soviet hardware, instead of stock footage of Korean War fighters...

CaptainDev's explanation holds most water just now - it looks like a training aircraft, but there's no reference to this plane anywhere in the lists of USAF aircraft on the internet that I can see, so the theory that it was under evaluation and was unsuccessful lends weight to the idea. Additionally, as the Air Force seemed to be unwilling to provide any active aircraft directly for TV shows like Airwolf, one could assume that they'd be more willing to hire out something they weren't actually using or going to use. (Could it also be that all the aerial footage was stock footage produced by the Air Force or the manufacturers, and the only shots made specifically for the show were those on the ground and the cock-pit close ups?)

O




I was thinking the same thing last night while watching a movie. Why would the US Airforce have a MiG 23U? And I couldn't help thinking that they wouldn't let Universal borrow it. The thing that really makes me mad is that I've seen this aircraft before, but I don't know where and I can't remember the name!
INTRUDER Posted - 12/12/2006 : 12:34:06
Can anybody see a tail number on the plane? It should start as N-----. If you can find one, and if the number still exsists, I could look it up and be able to tell what kind of aircraft it is, and it's owner. I look on airliners.net for 2 hours last night and couldn't find anything remotely close to it. Weird.
Fair_Owl Posted - 12/12/2006 : 10:55:31
It ain't a MiG! The MiG-23 has high swingwings, internally-mounted engines, a lower tail plane, and is generally much bigger. And was unavailable to TV shows in the 1980s; however, imagine what Airwolf shows would have been like in 1984 if they'd had access to genuine Soviet hardware, instead of stock footage of Korean War fighters...

CaptainDev's explanation holds most water just now - it looks like a training aircraft, but there's no reference to this plane anywhere in the lists of USAF aircraft on the internet that I can see, so the theory that it was under evaluation and was unsuccessful lends weight to the idea. Additionally, as the Air Force seemed to be unwilling to provide any active aircraft directly for TV shows like Airwolf, one could assume that they'd be more willing to hire out something they weren't actually using or going to use. (Could it also be that all the aerial footage was stock footage produced by the Air Force or the manufacturers, and the only shots made specifically for the show were those on the ground and the cock-pit close ups?)

O
C00nhunterJoe Posted - 12/12/2006 : 04:27:06
notice that the engines are in different locations
Captaindev Posted - 12/12/2006 : 01:21:47
For the life of me I cannot remember the name and manufacturer of this aircraft. About 5 years ago I saw a half-hour show on PBS here in the States that was if memory serves correct, about marketing. And it featured this jet and the manufacturer's efforts trying to sell it to the US Air Force. I'm still kicking myself for not taping this show...it would have been an interesting footnote to aircraft featured on Airwolf.
PeregrineFalcon Posted - 12/11/2006 : 23:00:57
Gillian and I have been talking about this topic and she came up with the idea that it resembled a MiG. So we both researched MiG aircraft and I came across a variant of the MiG 23, the MiG 23U (Flogger-C) on wikipedia. I read about it and then put it into Google Image Search and located a MiG 23U that looks similar to the jet on this site, just different colour. The link to the pic is: http://www.valka.cz/newdesign/v900/html_images/3_2004/image1079260868.JPG

Hope that helps!
corvettekid_7684 Posted - 12/11/2006 : 18:37:05
Isnt it a trainer?? A T-6 or something like that??
jrbirdman Posted - 12/11/2006 : 16:43:37
I could be wrong however, can anyone else help my friend here?
jrbirdman Posted - 12/11/2006 : 16:36:44
I believe it was a Cessna AT-40 or 44 I can't remember but I thought thats what it was.

= Offline, = Away, = Online
tv-series.com © 1994-2010 tv-series.com Go To Top Of Page
Snitz Forums 2000